Tree of Life

  • 28 September 2021

    In this guest post, Sadye Paez and Marcela Uliano-Silva explore what it takes to sequence the genomes of all life on Earth with the principles of justice, equity, diversity and inclusion.

  • Eimeria tenella oocysts
    23 September 20214.5 min read

    By sequencing the genome of this single-celled coccidian parasite, scientists hope to develop better vaccines to protect poultry from a disease that causes severe diarrhoea and death.

  • 25 Genomes Project wrap up blog
    18 December 20184.5 min read

    From ragworts that are too common and the tricky toughness of truffles to the trials of getting DNA samples a US Visa, Dan Mead gives his personal reflections on project managing the 25 Genomes Project

  • 12 November 20185.8 min read

    We have much to thank fungi and plants for, and the Darwin Tree of Life project will help us to unlock even more of their secrets to improve modern life

  • The Darwin Tree of Life Project and the Earth BioGenome Project are aiming to sequence all animals, birds, fish, insects and plants in the UK and on earth, respectively
    1 November 20185.1 min read

    Scientists have announced an ambitious goal to sequence all of life on earth. Here are 10 top facts that help to put the scale of the challenge into perspective…

  • The Darwin Tree of Life Project and the Earth BioGenome Project are aiming to sequence all animals, birds, fish, insects and plants in the UK and on earth, respectively
    1 November 20186.9 min read

    What will reading the genomes of all life on earth uncover? And how does the Sanger Institute intend to lead the sequencing of an estimated 60,000 species in the UK? Associate Director of the Wellcome Sanger Institute Julia Wilson talks about this ambitious project

  • 29 October 20184.1 min read

    The bat genome sequence could help us understand how these remarkable creatures are are reisitant to cancer, Ebola and SARS.

  • 25 Genomes: The Common Starfish. Image credit: Ray Crundwell
    4 October 20183.8 min read

    The Starfish genome could offer new approaches to wound healing and into surgical glue, if only we can get enough sperm.